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Apologies for the lateness on the Second “Weekly”! If you missed the first one, you can read it here. Without further ado, my three topical forays for this week:

1: Historical Figures re-imaged for the 21st Century

I came across this image slideshow from The Telegraph on a friend’s feed, and it was too good not to share. When the link is posted on Facebook, this tidbit of explanation appears with it (but not on the slideshow itself, somehow):

“A team of digital artists spent three months updating a series of classic portraits for a new TV series [on the history channel Yesterday called] Secret Life Of… They worked closely with award-winning historian Dr Suzannah Lipscomb to ensure the new artworks….”
… And then it is cut off.

First, a few humble observations:
- Henry VIII lost quite a bit of weight in the 21st century and appeared to have morphed into Tony Soprano.
- Shakespeare looks like a Brooklyn hipster… Are we sure he wouldn’t be, you know, a little more refined looking today? Glasses maybe?
- This team of digital artists must have saved themselves some effort… Elizabeth I’s 21st century image is just Tilda Swinton.

Left: Actual portrait of Elizabeth I. She had only a few versions of official portraits, so as to better control her image. This particular image is the Darnley Portrait. It was the most widely circulated official portrait of Elizabeth from its painting in the 1570s well into the 1590s.

Left: Actual portrait of Elizabeth I. She had only a few versions of official portraits, so as to better control her image. This particular image is the Darnley Portrait. It was the most widely circulated official portrait of Elizabeth from its painting in the 1570s well into the 1590s. Right: What Elizabeth I would supposedly look today. A.k.a. Tilda Swinton.

Secondly, and almost more importantly, where can I get a job making these 5 pictures alongside a team of other designers for THREE months? I am baffled.

All joking aside, does anyone know how this or similar modern-day hypothetical portraits are researched and conceptualized?

2. In Honor of The Great Gatsby film released this weekend…

gatsby

While you are busy stuffing your face with popcorn and basking in Leo’s glory (or not– some reviews are not too kind), researchers are soaking in the minutiae of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s life digitally like sponges. If you happen to be swinging through Columbia, South Carolina, it is also on display at the University of South Carolina’s Thomas Cooper Library until around June 6. The library holds what is considered to be the largest Fitzgerald collection in the world, with over 3,000 artifacts and memorabilia.

3. Modern Librarianship

I found a Publisher’s Weekly article that is very illustrative (if not exhausting) of issues that face modern-day librarians or those aspring to the profession. It is very public library focused however, and less so for academic or research institution librarianships. Having been reading and thinking about this for some time, I can’t say that I felt like anything I read was particularly new; however, some of the more simply stated things are taken for granted by most.

Technology is becoming a huge and ever-changing part of libraries.
“A library would be foolish not to utilize all the technology it can to reach its users. But the fact is, our users aren’t tripping over themselves to follow their public library on Twitter. And can you blame them?”

How one defines the function of a library determines how they would predict the future of libraries. I happen to agree with this assessment:
“The mission of librarians, according to Lankes, is to “improve society through facilitating knowledge creation in their communities.” I’d unpack that as saying librarians enable learning, which as any librarian will tell you is common practice.”

Generally, a very good read with useful linkage to other sources for any fellow possibly-aspiring-librarians-or-other-academics!

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